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Common Mistakes

Accepting the wrong Social Security Number
Failing to certify your return
Mailing your form to the improper address
Missing the time frame
Failure to prepare a copy of authorized form

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sc100 - FAQ

How can I share Google keep checklist to 100 people so they can each fill out their own list independently without interrupting each other?
There is a way to do this, although it is a little messy.Create your list.Give it a title.Label it with a project name. Make a copy of your list.Share the copy with person #1 and add their name in the title.Archive the shared list (to keep your main Keep view less cluttered). Repeat the "make a copy" section steps 98 more times, sharing with a different person each time.Share the original with the 100th person.Add their name to the title.Archive the shared list. This will take time to set up, but you will have 100 discrete lists shared with 100 individuals. You will also have a means to view all of the lists (find your label in the navigation panel by clicking the three lines in the upper left) while keeping your main view uncluttered. Adding each individual's name to the title helps you scan through the lists, and you can always use search to surface one quickly.
How can I get more people to fill out my survey?
Make it compellingQuickly and clearly make these points:Who you are and why you are doing thisHow long it takesWhats in it for me -- why should someone help you by completing the surveyExample: "Please spend 3 minutes helping me make it easier to learn Mathematics. Answer 8 short questions for my eternal gratitude and (optional) credit on my research findings. Thank you SO MUCH for helping."Make it convenientKeep it shortShow up at the right place and time -- when people have the time and inclination to help. For example, when students are planning their schedules. Reward participationOffer gift cards, eBooks, study tips, or some other incentive for helping.Test and refineTest out different offers and even different question wording and ordering to learn which has the best response rate, then send more invitations to the offer with the highest response rate.Reward referralsIf offering a reward, increase it for referrals. Include a custom invite link that tracks referrals.
Why don't schools teach children about taxes and bills and things that they will definitely need to know as adults to get by in life?
Departments of education and school districts always have to make decisions about what to include in their curriculum.  There are a lot of life skills that people need that aren't taught in school.  The question is should those skills be taught in schools?I teach high school, so I'll talk about that.  The typical high school curriculum is supposed to give students a broad-based education that prepares them to be citizens in a democracy and to be able to think critically.  For a democracy to work, we need educated, discerning citizens with the ability to make good decisions based on evidence and objective thought.  In theory, people who are well informed about history, culture, science, mathematics, etc., and are capable of critical, unbiased thinking, will have the tools to participate in a democracy and make good decisions for themselves and for society at large.  In addition to that, they should be learning how to be learners, how to do effective, basic research, and collaborate with other people.  If that happens, figuring out how to do procedural tasks in real life should not provide much of a challenge.  We can't possibly teach every necessary life skill people need, but we can help students become better at knowing how to acquire the skills they need.  Should we teach them how to change a tire when they can easily consult a book or search the internet to find step by step instructions for that?  Should we teach them how to balance a check book or teach them how to think mathematically and make sense of problems so that the simple task of balancing a check book (which requires simple arithmetic and the ability to enter numbers and words in columns and rows in obvious ways) is easy for them to figure out.  If we teach them to be good at critical thinking and have some problem solving skills they will be able to apply those overarching skills to all sorts of every day tasks that shouldn't be difficult for someone with decent cognitive ability  to figure out.  It's analogous to asking why a culinary school didn't teach its students the steps and ingredients to a specific recipe.  The school taught them about more general food preparation and food science skills so that they can figure out how to make a lot of specific recipes without much trouble.  They're also able to create their own recipes.So, do we want citizens with very specific skill sets that they need to get through day to day life or do we want citizens with critical thinking, problem solving, and other overarching cognitive skills that will allow them to easily acquire ANY simple, procedural skill they may come to need at any point in their lives?
How do I get CSS width and 100% for full screen width to work? I.e. when the parent element is  body , how do you get  body  to fill up the full screen width?
You should be using reset values to override the defaults set by the browser.Both the html and body tag need margin:0, padding:0another gotcha can be defaults applied to other block elements, so initializing with a reset in the first stylesheet loaded by a page is good practice.
How is sitting at a Tesla charging station for 75 minutes to fully charge the electric car better than filling up a gas car in 5 minutes?
Hi, happy Model 3 owner here, AWD, with he big battery, I think around 75kWH.Anyways, I am unsure where you got your information, but I am unaware of any Tesla owner (of any model) who needs to sit in their car for 75 minutes to fully charge —where exactly did you get that info from?Just this afternoon I needed to to stop at Target, on Coleman (San Jose, CA), and my battery was a bit less than 50%, so I also decided to Supercharge. I plugged in and walked in the direction of Target, but also decided I wanted to see if the Pet Smart had any birds…. After which I went to Target, grabbed what I needed and headed back to my car: By that time (about 20 minutes) my state of charge was around 220 miles of range, in a little more than 20 minutes. Not 100% “topped off” but then again, you’re not really supposed to “top off” your EV unless you’re actually doing a road trip, for battery longevity.Key points:Charging technology has advanced leaps and bounds over the past 5 years, especially with the most recent update to Tesla Super charging with version 3. Plus existing SC stations have are also receiving updates which will increase power output that will cut charge times by up to 50%.Charging times are *not* 75 minutes at SC stations, your info is flat wrong, back in January while running errands on a Sunday, we ran down our battery to about 70 miles range which made my wife uncomfortable (“range anxiety”) so we decided to try out SC for the first time: We plugged in and then went to Panera for soup and a sandwich. We finished our food in about 30 minutes walked out to the car and it was nearly fully charged. At peak charging rate (back then), the SC was “filling” my Model 3’s battery at a rate of 481miles/hr, or 118 Kw. (I have a screenshot from the Tesla app to prove this, but unfortutely Quora won’t let me upload it).Unlike cas cars ( ICE, aka internal combustion engine cars), EV’s generally don’t top off, unless you’re doing a road trip, again for battery longevity.Did I mention that super charging is free? How many car manufacturers give their customers 6 months of free “all you can eat” gasoline? Many early Tesla owners have free lifetime “gas.”Supercharging doesn’t make my hands stink: After having driven an EV for more than 5 years (my first EV was a Volt) you notice how much ICE cars simple stink. And they’re noisy too.Did I mention supercharging is free? My Model 3 has free “fuel” until mid September (should have only been 6 months from December ‘18) but I ain’t complaining. After than, “filling up” from nearly zero will cost less than $10 for 320 miles of range. How much does it cost to fill up your tank?Do you wake up every morning with your ICE car “gassed up” ready to go? I do: We have an EVSE at home, I plug in my Model 3 nightly, or every other night, and I wake up with my car ready to go (270 miles “in the tank”).Technology has advanced to the point that the only real advantage ICE vehicles could claim is now irrelevant. Yes, you literally can gas up in 5 minutes, but how many of you have a “gas station” in your own house? I do. :-)And yet, most people overlook the many advantages electric motos have over dirty, inneficient ICE motors:Less required regular maintenanceComparatively quiet operationCompact size to power outputSafer to operate: Did you know that 1 Ice car catches fire every 3 minutes in the USA? More than 174,000 ICE cars caught fire in 2015.How often do you actually use all the fuel in your ICE car in one day? Not often, I’m sure. But when you and I do, you gas up in five minutes and leave, stinking like gasoline. Me, I leave my car at the SC, grab a latte, maybe read some news, and in about 20 minutes I have enough range to finish up my day. On a “road trip” I’ll actually enjoy stretching my legs for the 30 minutes it will take to “top off.”Think of this post the next time you’re at the gas station paying $$30, $40 or more to gas up —and then smell your hands when you’re done.Cheers.
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